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Mar 24 2017 - Shayne Dobson named new ANB Athlete Representative

Athletics New Brunswick is happy to announce that Shayne Dobson will be ANB’s new Athlete Representative. Dobson, of Campbellton, and a graduate of Université de Moncton will hold this position for a two-year term. The board position involves full participation at all eight annual board meetings including voting rights and the opportunity to better understand how our organisation operates, how our board functions and most importantly be able to put forward his voice and the voice of the athletes he represents at the table. 

 

Shayne has always been a strong and inspiring athlete representing New Brunswick, and Canada proudly on a local, national, and international stage. Most recently Shayne represented Canada at the Rio2016 Paralympic Games finishing in fifth place in the world in the T37 1500m race. He also represented Canada at the 2011 Para Pan Am Games in Mexico, winning two medals at that event, and at the 2015 IPC World Championships in Qatar where he finished fourth in the 1500m.

 

On top of all this Shayne has been a longtime committed member of Athletics New Brunswick. Over the course of his two year term, he will give a voice to the athletes from New Brunswick as a whole.

 

“It is awesome to see an athlete as successful as Shayne Dobson to offer to serve athletes as a whole from his province”  President, Marc Lalonde said, “We would like to congratulate him on obtaining this position. Furthermore, we would like to thank Sarah Myatt who has served as the athlete representative for the past two years.


Mar 23 2017 - MacMackin Honoured with PRESTIGE Award

The Canadian Sport Tourism Alliance (CSTA) hosted their 11th annual PRESTIGE Awards on Tuesday, March 21 in Ottawa, Ontario. The CSTA’s main objective is to market Canada on an international scale, as a preferred sports tourism destination in partnership with its members. This year, the PRESTIGE (Program Recognizing Exceptional Sport Tourism Initiatives, Games & Events) Awards saw recipients from coast to coast. The awards recognize local events, major international championships/tournaments and also outstanding volunteers and groups who work to host and stage exceptional sports events across Canada.

Bill MacMackin, who has served as President of the Saint John Track Club for over a decade, was nominated and received the PRESTIGE Award for CSTA Sport Event Volunteer of the Year Award presented by CBC Sports. MacMackin was honoured with this award for his work on taking the East Coast Games from idea to reality. Under Bill’s guidance and leadership, the East Coast Games came to fruition and 3 years later brought together some 2,200 athletes, 1,500 parents and resulted in $800,000 in economic activity for the city. All of this was done while simultaneously serving as the Saint John Track Club President, coaching at Saint John High School and sitting on the board of Athletics Canada.

 

“Bill being honoured with such a prestigious award on a national scale, is very well deserved for all the hard work and dedication he put in to bringing the East Coast Games to reality,” said Marc Lalonde , president of Athletics NB. “Bill has been a real driving force for the advancement of track and field programming in our province and a true champion of the sport and we would like to congratulate him for his PRESTIGE Award and thank him for his dedication to track & field”.


Mar 22 2017 - Throw for Dave Meet & Silent Auction

Athletics New Brunswick will be hosting a throws meet on April 1st, 2017 to fundraise for one of our athletes. Dave Jefferson, of Saint John, is a masters athlete training out of the Saint John Track Club who has been competing in the sport for many years.

 

In addition to being a well-known athlete in the master's category, Dave has also volunteered as an official helping out at many meets. Recently, Dave’s apartment building in Saint John’s Heritage district was destroyed by a major fire.

 

This meet will serve as a fundraiser with all proceeds going directly to Dave. This is a great opportunity for our ANB community to help give back to one of our members. The meet will take place at the Ceps of l’Université de Moncton starting at 9am.

 

 Will consist of a mixed ambidex shot put challenge along with a mixed weight throw.  Every competitor will receive 6 throws PLUS 2 throws with their non-dominent hands (shot put). The winner of the ambidex challenge will be the best-combined throws using the best result from both hands.

 

One event will be $20 or $30 for both throws events.

 

 

Throw for Dave Meet   Competition Lancer pour Dave April 1st 2017 -

CEPS stade Vance-Toner Université de Moncton

 

20$ for 1 event 30$ for both throws

Deadline to register is March 30th (www.trackiere.com/ThrowForDave

 

9:00 - Mixed ambidex Shot Put Challenge

Every competitor will receive 6 throws PLUS 2 throws with their non-dominant hands.

 

A winner of the Ambidex challenge will be the best combined throws using best result from both hands.

 

10:30 - Mixed Weight throw

 

 

 

 

Silent Auction for Dave/Encant silencieux pour Dave

 

https://www.facebook.com/events/1285934194861345/

 

 (Check often as prizes will be added periodically)

 

Please share this link so we get lots of support! Or if you know of anyone or any business that would like to donate an item please contact ANB at anb@anb.ca

 

The auction is currently running and will be open until 11am April 5th.

 

Final bids time stamped at 10:59 am on April 5 will be the winner.

 

A starting bid will be posted.

 

Bids can increase by a minimum of $3 by leaving a comment with proposed price. Winners must pay (by PayPal, cheque or money order) within 48 hours the auction is closed.  We will arrange to pick up or shipping of prizes (Postage fee may be required)


Mar 20 2017 - Belyea Brings Home Gold from Masters Indoor Champs

The Canadian Masters Athletics Indoor Championships took place this year on March 11 and 12 in Toronto, with athletes competing from all over the country. One of said athletes was New Brunswick’s own, Ross Belyea. This was Ross’s first experience at the CMA Championships – and he did not disappoint.

Belyea, a native of Hartland, New Brunswick, is a retired school teacher. Although this was Belyea’s first experience at the Masters Indoors Champs, he is no stranger to the sport. His track and field career started in junior high and continued on in high school. Ross has maintained his interest in the sport to this day, often seen competing at several ANB meets.

Ross has stated that his goal moving forward is to stay as active as possible for as long as possible while continuing to take part in provincial and even national meets. He also plans on competing in the World’s Masters Competition in August of 2020 being held in Toronto. It is safe to say Belyea has been preparing for this, even going so far as to construct a long jump pit in his backyard.

“No matter what your age is, it takes work, will power and dedication to compete at any level. Always believe in yourself and give it your best. Set a goal and always strive to improve” said Belyea.

On the competition itself, Belyea stated “This competition was one of the highlights of my time in track and field. The competition was stiff and I am pleased to say that I met the challenge. I was impressed with the high caliber of the masters athletes overall. All in all, my first experience at the Canadian Masters was very rewarding.”

Ross competed in the Men’s 70-74 age category in several events with spectacular results. In the 50m dash, he placed first with a time of 7.89s which set a new provincial record.

In the long jump, Ross set a new meet record with a jump of 3.79m. His triple jump was just as impressive with a best jump of 8.00m. This broke his previous provincial record of 7.80m and shattered the meet record by 51cm.

Belyea also took part in the 4x200m relay with teammates from Edmonton and Saskatchewan and set a new meet record with a time of 2:12.88s.

“Ross had an outstanding performance at the CMA Indoors this year and represented NB very well” said Gabriel LeBlanc, Executive Director of Athletics New Brunswick. “To come home with medals and provincial records is very exciting news. Ross is a veteran of the sport and we wish him success in all of his future meets!”

Full results can be found here: http://www.trackie.com/track-and-field/results_docs/cma-indoor-championships2017-03-12-19-02-36.pdf


Mar 12 2017 - Atlantic Indoor Track & Field Championships Recap

The Atlantic Indoor Track & Field Championships took place this weekend at the CEPS facility of the Université de Moncton campus. New Brunswick athletes performed greatly, with 8 provincial records being set.

Provincial record performances include:

- In the bantam girls' pentathlon, both Onisha Goguen-Tshimbalang of Moncton and Abby Dubé of Fredericton went under the old provincial record of 1167, with Goguen-Tshimbalang finishing with a score of 1480, and Dubé with a score of 1214.

- Jordan Henri of Moncton won the youth boy's 60m with a new provincial youth record time of 7.05. Henri also won the 200m with a time of 23.15.

- Kyla Hughes of Cocagne won the Youth girl’s Shot Put with a new record of 13.92m beating her previous record of 13.38m.

-The ASEA junior boy’s relay team bested both the junior and U23 records beating the previous records of 1:38.00 and 1:37.27 respectively with a huge time of 1:37.04. The team consisted of Clint Steeves, Tim Poirier, Mickyle Welsh and Jordan Henri.

- Carol Lynn Landry beat the women’s 40-44 200m and 400m records with times of 37.61s and 1:26.77.

- Robert Jackson is the new holder of the 60-64 men’s 1500m with a time of 4:52.06.

-Heather LeBlanc set a new mark in the women's 50-54 shot put with a toss of 7m16.

Other notable performances include:

- Erin Vringer of Saint John won the bantam girls' 800m with a time of 2:29.90 and the 1200m with a time of 4:01.26.

- Shelby MacIsaac of Riverview won the midget girls' 60m with a time of 8.27, the high jump with a height of 1.50m, and won silver in the long jump with a best attempt of 4.35m.

- Ryan Evans of Saint John won the junior men's pentathlon with a score of 2993, just missing the provincial record of 3029 set in 2015.

"These are great final results for the province's indoor track season," said Gabriel LeBlanc, Technical Director of Athletics New Brunswick. "We now look forward to an exciting summer season that will feature Legions, Canada Games, Jeux de la Francophonie Canadienne, and the Jeux de la Fracophonie Internationale, among other events."

Pictou County Athletics Club won the championship banner with a score of 530, while A.S.E.A. Track Club finished second with a score of 375, and Valley Athletics finished third with a score of 312.

Full Results to the Atlantic Track & Field Championships can be found here: anb.ca/Results/view-results.php?id=921

By: Brandon Scott LeBlanc


Mar 11 2017 - New Brunswick Athletes Shine at USports Championships

New Brunswick's best university athletes were in action this weekend at the USports Track & Field Championships, taking place in Edmonton, Alberta. Strong performances lead to four relay medals (1 gold, 1 silver, and 2 bronze) and three provincial records!

On the women's side:

- Sarah Myatt of Fredericton, competing for Dalhousie University, finished 8th in the 600m with a personal best time of 1:33.55, and tied for 8th in the 1000m with a personal best time of 2:51.21. Myatt was also a member of the Dalhousie 4x800m relay team that finished 5th with a time of 9:08.18.

- Sydney MacDonald of Miramichi, competing for the University of New Brunswick, finished 7th in the pentathlon with a score of 3297, a new provincial U23 record.

- Tess MacDonald of Fredericton, competing for the University of New Brunswick, finished 7th in the triple jump with a personal best of 11.79m.

- Victoria LeBlanc of Saint John, competing for the University of New Brunswick, finished 12th in the long jump with a best attempt of 5.27m.

- Isabelle Morris of Bellefond, competing for Université de Moncton, finished 12th in the pentathlon with a score of 2778.
On the men's side:

- Nick MacMackin of Quispamsis, competing for the University of Windsor, had a strong weekend, racing five times. Nick finished 4th in the 1000m with a time of 2:26.09, and 11th in the 1500m with a time of 4:01.84. In the 600m, Nick finished 5th with a time of 1:18.82, bettering both the provincial U23 and senior records. MacMackin also won silver as a member of the Windsor 4x800m relay team that finished with a time of 7:30.39.

- Jack Berkshire of Fredericton, competing for the University of Toronto, won gold as a member of the Toronto 4x200m relay team, and bronze as a member of the Toronto 4x400m relay team, finishing with times of 1:28.06 and 3:18.26, respectively.

- Andrew LeBlanc of Fredericton, competing for the University of Guelph, won bronze as a member of the Guelph 4x800m relay team that finished with a time of 7:31.92.

- Adrian Kinney of Bristol, competing for St. FX University, finished 7th in the 60m with a time of 6.94. In the prelims, Adrian ran a personal best time of 6.91.

- Alain Docuet of Dieppe, competing for Université de Moncton, finished 10th in the heptathlon with a score of 4211.

- David Kerr of Fredericton, competing for Dalhousie University, finished 10th in the weight throw with a best attempt of 15.16m.

- Liam Turgeon of Tidehead, competing for the University of New Brunswick, finished 11th in the weight throw with a best attempt of 15.13m.
- Jon Gionet of Bathurst, competing for the University of New Brunswick, finished 12th in the shot put with a best attempt of 13.27m.

Full Results can be found here: www.trackie.com/track-and-field/Articles/2017-usports-track-field-live-stream-live-results-and-more/15798/

"These are fantastic performances from some of New Brunswick's best athletes," said Gabriel LeBlanc, Technical Director of Athletics New Brunswick. "These results show great potential as we head into a summer featuring Canada Games and Jeux de la Francophonie Internationale."   By: Brandon Scott LeBlanc


Mar 8 2017 - Atlantic Indoor Track & Field Championships this Saturday

The Atlantic Indoor Track & Field Championships are set to take place this Saturday at the CEPS facility on the Université de Moncton campus. The competition will feature many of New Brunswick best age class athletes, while the province's best university athletes compete at the USport Track & Field Championships in Edmonton. Over 240 Athletes are expected at this, the final indoor event of the season.   Events to watch include:

- The youth girl's shot put will feature national gold medalist Kyla Hughes of Cocagne who has a season's best of 13.21m.

- Shelby MacIsaac of Riverview will be competing in the 60m, high jump, and long jump with season bests of 8.18 in the 60m and 1.50m in the high jump.

- The youth men's 60m and 200m will feature Jordan Henri of Moncton. Henri comes into the meet with season-best performances of 7.09 in the 60m and 22.84 in the 200m.

- Alex Witmer of Moncton, NB  will compete in the men's high jump. Witmer has a clearing of 2.10m this season.   - The men's pentathlon promises to be an exciting one with 19 participants signed up for the event, including Troy Wilson of Woodstock, Dan Brown of Hampton, Jonathan Bunn of Barrie, ON, and Christian Richard of Moncton.  

Last year’s team champions were Moncton’s ASEA (Athletics South East/Athlétisme Sud-Est). This year they will be challenged by Pictou Athletics, Fredericton Legion Track Club, Saint John Track Club and several others.

Admission is free and the completion starts at 9:00am and should be finished around 4:45pm.


"This will certainly be an exciting competition for our region's best age class athletes," said Gabriel LeBlanc, Executive Director of Athletics New Brunswick. "This will also be a great last chance to set indoor records as this is the last indoor competition of the season."

Full Schedule and Meet program are available here: 

By: Brandon Scott LeBlanc


Mar 7 2017 - ANB Athletes set to compete at USports National Championships

On March 9-11 the University of Alberta in Edmonton will be hosting the National USport Track and Field Championships and 13 of NB’s best will be competing. This marks a new record for New Brunswick athletes competing at the national University Championships ever!

 

Among the high quality athletes competing will be ANB’s own:

 

Adrian Kinney of Bristol in the 60m where he is seeded 9th, representing St. FX.

Nick MacMackin of Quispamsis in the 600m seeded 4th, 1000m where he is seeded 5th, 1500m where he is seeded 6th as well as the 4x800m relay where is University of Windsor teammates go into the competition as the top ranked team in the nation and are looking to defend their gold medal from 2016.

UdeM has two NB athletes competing, Alain Doucet of Dieppe who is seeded 12th in the Heptathlon, and Isabelle Morris of Miramihi  who is seeded 12thin the Pentathlon.

Dalhousie University is sending David Kerr of Fredericton who  is seeded 10th in the Weight Throw and Sarah Myatt of Fredericton in the 600m where she is seeded 12th and the 1000m where she is seeded 11th.  Sarah will also be competing with her Dalhousie teammates in the 4x800m relay.

UNB is sending five athletes, Tess MacDonald of Fredericton who is seeded 11th in the Triple Jump, Victoria Leblanc of Saint John who is seeded 14th in the Long Jump, Sidney MacDonald of Miramichi who is seeded 10th in the Pentathlon, Liam Turgeon of Tide Head who is seeded 12th in the Weight Throw and Jonathan Gionet of Bathurst who is seeding in 4th in the Shot Put.

Jack Berkshire of Fredericton who will be representing the University of Toronto in the 4x400m relay and Andrew Leblanc of Fredericton who will be representing Guelph in the 4x800m.

 

Several New Brunswick athletes are also nominated for national awards. Tess McDonald and Troy Wilson from the University of New Brunswick are the AUS conference nominees for the community service awards combing athletics, academics, and community service.  The awards brunch and winners will be announced on the morning of Thursday March 9th.

 

On behalf on all of ANB I would like to wish each of these athletes the very best at this wonderful competition. 

  On behalf on all of ANB I would like to wish each of these athletes the very best at this wonderful competition. On March 9-11 the University of Alberta in Edmonton will be hosting the National USport Track and Field Championships and 12 of NB’s best will be competing. This marks a new record for New Brunswick athletes competing at the national University Championships ever!   Among the high quality athletes competing will be ANB’s own:    Adrian Kinney in the 60m where he is seeded 9th, representing St. FX. Nick MacMackin in the 600m seeded 4th, 1000m where he is seeded 5th, 1500m where he is seeded 6th as well as the 4x800m relay where is University of Windsor teammates go into the competition as the top ranked team in the nation and are looking to defend their gold medal from 2016. UdeM has two NB athletes competing, Alain Doucet who is seeded 12th in the Heptathlon, and Isabelle Morris who is seeded 12thin the Pentathlon. Dalhousie University is sending David Kerr who  is seeded 10th in the Weight Throw and Sarah Myatt in the 600m where she is seeded 12th and the 1000m where she is seeded 11th.  Sarah will also be competing with her Dalhousie teammates in the 4x800m relay. UNB is sending five athletes, Tess MacDonald who is seeded 11th in the Triple Jump, Victoria Leblanc who is seeded 14th in the Long Jump, Sidney MacDonald who is seeded 10th in the Pentathlon, Liam Turgeon who is seeded 12th in the Weight Throw and Jonathan Gionet who is seeding in 4th in the Shot Put. Jack Berkshire who will be representing the University of Toronto in the 4x400m relay and Andrew Leblanc who will be representing Guelph in the 4x800m.   Several New Brunswick athletes are also nominated for national awards. Tess McDonald and Troy Wilson from the University of New Brunswick are the AUS conference nominees for the community service awards combing athletics, academics, and community service.  The awards brunch and winners will be announced on the morning of Thursday March 9th.    On behalf on all of ANB I would like to wish each of these athletes the very best at this wonderful competition.


Mar 7 2017 - TASG : Episode Four: The Alter Egos

We’re Sarah and Grace, two New Brunswick gals who train, race, and live as elite middle distance runners. After our collegiate careers, we knew we weren’t quite finished with sport — so, we joined Athletics Canada’s West Hub training centre and launched ourselves into our passion!

 

Now, we float through Victoria’s lush rainforests and stride across grey sand beaches. From this base, we get to travel to secluded corners of the world and meet boatloads of incredible people. We both started running as kids and competed in local New Brunswick races; then, when we got older, we became a part of ANB’s High Performance Program. Even though our dreams have now carried us away, the picture province of NB never stops feeling like home.

 

Sometimes workouts gut us, injuries temporarily sideline us, and bad races leave us discouraged, but those moments occupy only a small portion of this life. Our phenomenal coach, Heather Hennigar, guides and inspires us to find joy in the day-by-day process. We’ve forged close relationships with our teammates, and each workout means another opportunity to tease and goof off.

 

Every day, we train to become the best athletes we can—but, more than that, we aspire to lead lives full of love, laughter, and adventure. Often, we’re asked about our training schedule, our races, or what it takes to try and be the best. Well, we’re still trying to figure it out. But, we’ve committed ourselves to one howling journey, and we can’t wait to see where the currents take us. We’d love to show you an inside look into our intense, quirky, rambunctious, draining, animating, dopy, and soul-filling lives. Thank you for reading along!

 

 

 

Episode Four: The Alter Egos

 

Light rain drizzled from the stormy Victoria sky. Ahead, a grey and glass building emerged from a cover of arbutus trees and fog. Pacific Institute of Sport Excellence in the moody morning I mused, as I closed the writing app on my phone and hopped off the bus. The weight of my backpack settled on my shoulders; in its pockets I’d stuffed my work clothes, a day’s worth of food, and my books and laptop.

            I ascended the muddy hill just as Sarah stepped out of her car. She shouldered her bag and jogged to meet me. “You working today?”

            “Which work do you mean?” I laughed. The answer was all of them – hence the backpack crammed with food.

After the West Hub crew bid farewell to the San Diego sun, we flew home to rain and real life responsibilities. Though we’re all full time athletes, most people in our group hold down outside jobs. I gave Sarah a rundown of my day, and she invited me to visit her at the lab, where she works. 

            “But first.” I brandished my travel mug. “We lift!”

 

Elite athletes are often branded with the idea of work ethic, of toughness and drive. The image of pumping iron and pounding pavement seems to reach the public before the image of a whole person. Sometimes, that marketing strategy can make it seem like athletes only exist in their place of work. It’s like of how, in elementary school, kids assume their teachers dissolve beyond the walls of the classroom. I can assure you, though, Sarah and I exist beyond the edges of a track.

After weights and a run, we changed into clothes not made of spandex; like butterflies, we visually transformed into our alter egos. I call mine Responsible Grace. She really likes to wear suspenders.

Squirreled away in a cozy chair, I munched on quinoa bean salad and opened my laptop. At the table next to me, members of the women’s national rugby team burst into peals of laughter. I plugged into my headphones, pulled up a word document, and started typing. 

Responsible Grace keeps pretty busy. Before practice, she tutors writing and research skills; between morning and afternoon sessions, she sits in PISE’s lobby and painstakingly pounds out an MA thesis. In the evenings, she sells shoes at Running Room, and, on airplanes or at bus stops, she writes news articles and edits for companies.

After weights, Sarah rushed out to her car and sped to the BC Cancer Agency. Once there, she donned a white lab coat and slipped her hands into blue gloves, her armor in the crusade against cancer. At her station, she grows human T cells, studies each individual cell, and genetically modifies them to enhance their fitness in the tumor microenvironment. This research aims to improve immune cells’ metabolism, so that when the patient receives their new cells, they can better combat the tumor.

In 2016, Sarah trained full time and produced a breakout season on the track. Though her eleven-second PB often steals the highlight reel, the most incredible part of her season was that she simultaneously completed her masters in biochemistry. Now, she works on contract for the same lab, generating new research and publications. Plus, in a typical week, Sarah also tutors special needs students and studies for the MCATs.

 

For us, the toughest part of being an athlete lies in the balancing act: the ability to train full time while finishing a masters thesis, also while working to pay the bills. However, this additional dimension comes with a significant perk, one that neither of us would trade for the world. Because of our other pursuits and responsibilities, Sarah and I know who we are outside of athletics.

            One Saturday morning, I struggled through interval sessions on the track, and fell badly behind the rest of the group. Breathing hard, I let Heather pull me aside and listened as she told me to call it and go jog a cooldown. It was the right decision, but I still clomped through trails, bemoaning my woes to any squirrel that would listen.  

            Later, the West Hub coagulated in the tub room. Towels wrapped around our heads for warmth, we alternated between the hot and cold tubs, flushing our legs and boosting recovery. The cold water lapped at my thighs, and I quietly stared into the tiny waves.

Sarah poked me in the bellybutton. “You gonna work on your thesis this afternoon?” I looked up. Her smile was kinda smug. The words sounded familiar, and I may have been annoyed.

But then, I held her gaze and realized that she was right.

 

Sarah and I structure our busy lives around a rigid training schedule so that hopefully, one day, we can compete against the best. Within each week, six mornings begin with workout or long run, while five afternoons end with another form of aerobic activity. In between we receive treatment, meet with coaches, and provide daily logs of heart rate and sleep. Given this focalized lifestyle, we cannot ignore our choice to pursue elite athletics. And, sometimes, our choice’s constant presence tricks us into believing that we’re just athletes, just the sum total of our physical capabilities.

Our other pursuits remedy this identity chasm. That Saturday, I could have spent the day dejected, fretting the workout while stretching on a yoga mat. Instead, I went home and wrote a scene where a character reached a state of failure. While I’ll wait for my supervisor’s response to decide if the scene’s any good, the act of writing helped me forget about the crummy morning and allowed me to move on with life. Being able to turn to another pursuit, whether it’s a passion or just work, always eases the strain of the athlete life. We’re more than just gals in split shorts, and fulfilling our other interests siphons the pressure of perfect athletic execution.

In San Diego, Sarah’s Achilles flared and she biked a workout instead of strapping on her spikes. At lunch, I watched her swallow more sighs than rice pilaf, and tried to think of what to say.

In the privacy of our dorm room, Responsible Grace snapped her suspenders and told Sarah to go study for her MCATs. Sarah spent the afternoon pouring over textbooks and rocking out to new illegal downloads. By the time dinner arrived, she strode into the dining hall wearing her usual dopy grin.

Yes we are athletes, but first and foremost, Sarah and I are fully-fledged people. Thankfully, together, we can keep each other “on track”, and make sure we each step into the other parts of ourselves.

 

 

Thanks for reading!

 

xoxox

S&G

 


Mar 6 2017 - Practice & Teaching

Recently, I read a book titled Practice Perfect by Doug Lemov, Erica Woolway, and Katie Yezzi.  This book provided 42 rules for improvement. This posting will highlight three of the rules and a few thoughts as it relates to athletics coaching.

Rule 2- Practice the 20

            Many are aware of the 80/20 rule where 80 percent of results come from 20 percent of the sources.  As a coach, I have hundreds if not thousands of exercises, routines, activities, and training modalities that I could use. However, I don’t.  I have a stable set of exercises, routines, and training modalities that I use to elicit responses. This is not because I am bored or lazy but rather because I know they work and while I will try to inject some novelty within the exercise/routine/modalities it always keeps the same core feeling. I propose that we examine sprinting and the goal of getting an athlete as fast as possible. If we think in terms of 80/20 then we want to hone in on the 20% of what actually works in making athletes faster. In this case, the direction is towards maximum velocity sprints and acceleration work. Please remember I not suggesting that this is all that you need to do but rather if the goal is to get faster than focus on what you know works and get results. In this case I would say that 80% of sprint improvements are going to come from sprinting. The authors state, “You have to build a map of your goals from the outset. And you have to design extremely high-quality activities for each of your 20-percenters that get progressively more complex. On the other hand, once you’ve done that, you’ll no longer waste time preparing a smorgasbord of activities that you’ll use briefly and discard. You invest in developing better activities that you will use over and over. In the end this may save you work.”

 

Here are two key recommendations for the 20:

1)   Identify the 20 percent of things you could practice that will deliver 80 percent of the value.

2)   Practice the highest-priority things more than everything else combined.

 

Rule 5 – Replace your Purpose (with an Objective)

            This one is a bit more semantic in nature but I think it is extremely important. Every practice that I (and you) probably organize has a purpose. Some reason that you are doing what you are doing (which is great) but an objective provides greater clarity and focus. Let’s say that I am working with a hurdler who has been having issues making the three strides pattern between the hurdles. My hypothesis in this situation is that the athletes trail leg and position coming off the hurdle is not in position to facilitate velocity between the hurdles and thus needs to be refined. As such, I come with an objective for the next practice where we want to hit an ideal lead leg touchdown position with the trail leg in an “A” position up tall and in front of the body 90% of the time as evaluated through video. This now provides clarity as to what we are trying to achieve rather than just what we are going to do.  The authors state, “Many practices begin with the thought, “what am I going to do tomorrow?” (or even this afternoon!). When you ask this question, you are starting with an activity, not an objective – with the action, not the reason for it. In the end, you can’t decide if any activity is the right one to do until you know why you’re doing it. Instead, start by asking what you are going to accomplish, and then ask what the best route to that goal is. When an objective is made first, before the activity, it guides you in choosing or adapting your activities. When it comes second, after you decide what you’ll do, it is a justification.”

 

Here are two key recommendations for Replace your Purpose (with an Objective):

1)   Replace your vague idea of a “purpose” with a manageable and measurable objective that is made ahead of the practice and gives mastery guidance.

2)   Teach skills in a sequence of objectives of increasing complexity.

 

Rule 13 – Make a Plan

            Coaches plan all the time. I have made or used quadrennial plans, annual plans, seasonal plans, phase & period plans, monthly plans, weekly plans, daily plans, and session plans. Each plan provides just enough information so that I can see how all the plans build onto of one another and fit together. However, how do I make sure that my plans line up? How am I getting the information to make the plan? Previous Coaching Connection posts looked at data and how it can be used to help guide the plan. The authors provide three keys for planning:

1)    “Plan with Data-Driven Objectives in Mind”.

Previous Coaching Connection posts have explored the topic of data and how it can help guide plans and decisions that coaches make. Athlete X wants to win a medal at the Canada Games. What does the data suggest it will take? How does this information guide the objectives that Athlete X needs to be able to achieve in a competitive environment? Let the data guide the development of capacities, skill sets, and abilities.

2)    “Plan Down to the Last Minutes”

Fairly simply the authors state that good plans for practice leave nothing to chance. There are no questions as to what is going to happen next, when that drill will take place, or what is needed here or there. Sure, this is going to add in the time required to plan the practice but by having a detailed plan with all areas identified I would wager that the practice runs smoothly and efficiently or at the very least you are more prepared for any changes that might pop up unexpectedly.

3)    “Rehearse and Revise the Plan”

At this stage, you have a plan that has been put together with data and key objectives resulting in well thought decisions. You have planned and put it together with all the details in place. Now, can you rehearse it and revise it? Can you practice your practice session or can you video your practice session and look for improvements in how it is delivered? The authors state, “The time you make to practice training activities in advance always results in a better practice because it leads to better plans. We have scrapped activities, drastically revised activities, and simplified directions for clarity. Is this worth the time?”

These are just three of the 42 rules examined in the text. I have no doubt that I will be re-reading this one in the future and referring to it again. I would encourage coaches who are looking for information on how to reflect, analyze, and improve their practices to consider reading this text.

 

This article is the fifth of a monthly segment called Coaching Connection. If you are looking for additional ideas or assistance with any of the details above, do not hesitate to reach out. Additionally, ideas for future topics are encouraged or if you would like to contribute to this monthly activity please contact Coaching Education Director Jason Reindl at jasonreindl@me.com


Mar 3 2017 - Athletics New Brunswick is seeking applications for its 2017 provincial Legion program.

Led by the New Brunswick Legion Command 4 coaches will be selected to assist with the care of the athletes during the course of the trip however, their primary duties will be centered on the competition portion of the meet. 

Interested individuals should submit a letter of interest to anb@anb.caby April 5th, 2017.

More details available here: http://www.anb.ca/page.php?content=legion2017aplicEN


Mar 2 2017 - 2017 Canada Summer Games - Team NB Athletics Update (March 2nd, 2017)

Greetings,

As the indoor season begins to wind down and the focus starts to shift towards the outdoor season the 2017 Jeux Canada Games will soon take center stage. The 2017 Games which takes place during Canada’s 150 celebrations promises to be a great event in Winnipeg July 27th to August 5th as Athletics is a 1st week sport.

Please read carefully the following information as details are extremely important for prospective (those who hope to make) Team NB Athletics members:

It is important to reminder that no athletes have been selected to the team and no athletes will be selected to the team prior to the MANDATORY trials event June 23-25 in Saint John. All athletes, at this point, have an equal chance of making the team with all decisions being based off of performance at the MANDATORY trials as laid out in the approved selection criteria. http://www.anb.ca/documents/uploads/2017%20CG%20Selection%20Version%203%20-%20EN.pdf

Trials are taking place in Saint John, NB June 23-25 in conjunction with the East Coast Games. Participation is MANDATORY so all prospective athletes must be in Saint John this weekend. The event can be found in the calendar section of the ANB website. A tentative schedule and rules for the event have been posted within the event as well as within the CSG programs page on the ANB website. http://www.anb.ca/Calendar/view-event.php?id=1279

Selection Criteria (Edition 3) has been posted within the trials event located in the calendar and within the CSG programs page on the ANB website. http://anb.ca/Programs/canada-summer- games.php

Travel – Members of Team NB are expected to travel with Team NB (all sports). Athletics is a week 1 sport and will depart New Brunswick from Moncton on Thursday July 27th at 10:00am and 6:30pm and return to Moncton on Saturday August 5th arriving in Moncton at 2:30pm.

Travel 2 – Very Important, if prospective Team NB athletes are anticipating difficulty with the above travel plans and are seeking an alternative travel departure and return locations for training and academic reasons only (i.e. residing out of province during the summer where their post-secondary (university) institution is located). They must let Head Coach Jason Reindl know by April 15th, 2017. Failure to inform Jason of the potential need for alternative travel arrangements by April 15th will result in the athlete being responsible for arranging and paying for all costs associated with getting to the games either by traveling to Moncton or directly to and from Winnipeg from their alternative departure city.

Travel 3 – Very important, if prospective Team NB athletes are not planning on returning to Moncton after the games (e.g, vacation with family or continuing directly to another competition) they must inform Head Coach Jason Reindl by May 15th, 2017. Team NB and Athletics NB are not responsible for arranging return travel options back to New Brunswick other than the games organized departure on Saturday August 5th. Note, as the National Legion Championships are in Brandon August 9-15 any athletes who are hoping to take part in both events should be discussing their travel plans with their personal coaches and parents as to what they may do. Start planning now.

Team NB Rally – All participants who ARE SELECTED to Team NB Athletics after the trials are expected to be in Moncton for the Team NB Rally on Monday July 3rd, 2017. Athletes who are residing in a different province at the time for academic or other approved reasons by the Head Coach will be excused from attending this expected team event. The rally will be taking place from 10:00am to 5:00pm at Odyssee High School (

Tickets – Event tickets for the Games are now on sale. http://www.2017canadagames.ca/en/content/tickets

Staffing – Yvan Pelletier has resigned his positon as a CSG coach as he has accepted a position with Team NB at the 2017 Jeux de la Francophonie games July 21-30 in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire. This is the best decision for the all of Athletics NB and we wish Yvan and Team NB at JDLF the best of luck at this event. As such a coaching position is currently open. Head Coach Jason Reindl is following the process approved during the initial coach selections that occurred March 26, 2015. A coach has been contacted in regards to confirming availability and the CSG program along with Coach New Brunswick is working with the coach to meet the necessary requirements. A formal announcement will occur once the coach is officially named to the team.

Please make sure to join our facebook group “CSG 2017 NB Athletics Team Info Hub / JDC 2017 Équipe Athlétisme du NB Info” as information, updates, and reminders will be posted here.

If you have any questions regarding the information above or any other questions regarding the 2017 Team NB athletics program at the 2017 Canada Summer Games please do not hesitate to get in touch with our Head Coach Jason Reindl or any other members of the coach staff.

Sincerely,
2017 Athletics CSG Staff and Program

Jason Reindl - Head Coach - (506) 343-2149 - jasonreindl@me.com

Rachelle McDonald – Manager – mcdonald.rachelle@gmail.com

Sue Ellis-Loparco – Manager – Sue.EllisLoparco@nbed.nb.ca -

Jennifer Butler – Coach & W 4x400m – jennifernoblebutler@gmail.com

Kathleen Kiely – Coach & W 4x100m – kathleenkiely@hotmail.com

Peter Stuart – Coach & M 4x400m – stuart@nbnet.nb.ca - (506) 387-2554H or (506) 866-1982(c) 

Bill MacMackin – Coach – bill@selectfh.ca - (506) 647-4931 (c)

Athena Francis – Apprentice Coach – athenafrancis9@gmail.com

Jason Agnew – Special O Coach - jason.agnew@nbed.nb.ca 

2017-11-22 - New Brunswick athletes ready for National Cross Country Championships
2017-11-20 - 18th Annual Gagetown Meet & ANB Awards Gala
2017-11-05 - Atlantic Cross Country Championships Recap
2017-11-02 - Lalonde, Doucet, Dickinson, LeBlanc , Coombes, Church and Arseneault among Sport NB's Konica Minolta Sport Awards Finalist
2017-10-30 - Atlantic Athletics Summit

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